~An article by Jordan Volz


Introduction : 2004

For over a decade this worldwide experimental project known as "post-rock" had been brewing. Initially this project sought to do exactly as its name had suggested -- to free music from the past half-century of rock influence and elevate it to a higher plane of existence. So in the early nineties, as some bands progressed down grunge and alternative rock avenues, there was a select handful who were creating what later would become known as "post-rock." These bands would serve as pioneers of the genre and later provide much needed guidance to young bands who had become disillusioned with the commercial music all around them.

Slowly more and more bands began to pick up this style of music over the years and what began as an experiment quickly turned into a movement. This movement gradually became less about the style of the music created by the pioneers of the genre and more about the techniques which were employed. The tepid, brooding build-up of instrumentation and the cathartic, chaotic release which followed became a signature landmark for "post-rock" bands. Crescendos, cascades, tremolo, ambiance -- all common phrases for bands of this ilk. Some bands employed vocals and others opted to leave out this misleading characteristic. By the end of the twentieth century the post-rock movement was beginning to see the realization of a counter movement, one which brought its back in alignment with "rock" compositions yet still held tightly onto the lengthy presentations and quiet/loud schema. At this point in time the term "post-rock" didn't feel like it accurately represented this experiment any longer, and perhaps the term "instrumental rock" became a better identifier.

At the beginning of 2004, instrumental rock had covered a lot of ground. Aside from the aforementioned post-rock bands, it had begun to work its way into the worlds of jazz, classical, metal, and electronic music. But, what it hadn't done is to dip back into mainstream music and adequately provide a gateway between this experimental genre and a commercial sound. Or, more accurately, it had successfully prevented this from happening, as many of the original pioneers of the movement found themselves disgusted by popular and mainstream music. Leave it to a British band to change all of that.

65 Days of Static isn't shy about telling the world how much it loves pop music. While it might not be readily apparent from this Sheffiled act's proper releases, one look at the band's unreleased material shows a startling embrace of this pre-packaged, spoon-fed, pop-friendly music. One might think that the caustic remixes of Christina Auguilera or Natasha Bedingfield are meant in jest, but in the end it appears to be quite the contrary. 65 Days of Static appear in 2004 with a fresh view of instrumental music -- one maybe digestible for the masses -- and by the looks of it they'll be stopping at nothing to get this music into the ears of anyone that'll listen. This then begs the question: is this band the next best thing or are is it simply the "post-rock antichrist?"

Hands down, 65 Days of Static is the next best thing and this is a name we'll be hearing a lot in the upcoming years. This is the beginning of the second wave of instrumental rock bands. Some have awkwardly tagged this as the "neo-post rock" movement, but as it really has nothing in common with the post-rock mind-set, other than a highly instrumental approach, I'm cautious to adopt such a term. It is clear that The Fall of Math is a catalyst of sorts, one that erases the inherent pretension in the genre and relaxes the feeling of great importance accredited to instrumental music. For the first time in a long time we begin to see a large number of bands emerge and start making fun, energetic music that doesn't need to solve any of the world's great problems or instill a heavy political message. Music is music and it's ok to leave it at that. And while 65 Days of Static doesn't leave the palette with no political message, it's not an overbearing presence in the band's work.

As we quietly close the book on 2004, the instrumental genre has never looked healthier or more open to possibilities. While several bands have provided landmark albums to the instrumental rock world, few have been able to accomplish what 65 Days of Static have done and opened several new doors of exploration. In doing so, the band has likely signed its own death warrant, as it will never be able to fully exhaust all the possibilities presented in The Fall of Math and it is unlikely that it will ever be able to stun the world with such a refreshing and brilliant sound again.

Our hats are off to 65 Days of Static in 2004, whom have made it quite a memorable and enjoyable year with The Fall of Math.

~Jordan Volz


The List


50) The Antarcticans | The Antarcticans
United States

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Music: Click Here
Label: The New Black Music

Hailing from California (not Antarctica), The Antarcticans' self-titled debut clocks in at just under forty minutes of instrumental rock. While only three tracks long, The Antarcticans gives three pretty distinct (and different) tastes of the band. "One" lets loose in a fury of psychedelia-inspired jamming, which gives way to some caustic experimentation and then relapses back into the jam-oriented instrumental bliss. "Two " is much more of a quiet/loud experience, building up to a deafening wall of sound that leaves the listener grabbing for his ears while The Antarcticans plow through the sonic terrain. The last track stitches together some transitions (which is notably missing from the first two songs) and takes a stab at building a foundation that relies on song structure and varying compositional styles. This is inevitably the one thing that the band could improve upon, but after forty minutes of hypnotic droning it doesn't really appear to be concerned too much with stylistic problems anyway.

Key Tracks: One; Two


49) The Fastest Steed on Earth | It's Slang for Heroin
United States

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Label: Self-Released

Those who like their music filled to the brim with noise and conflicting sounds will fall in love with The Fastest Steed on Earth. By looking at the song titles alone ("The Chain Saw Assacre"), it's pretty clear that It's Slang for Heroin is going to be a unique listen. The band harnesses the work of circus-rock acts such as Mr. Bungle, Tub Ring, and Dog Fashion Disco during its exploration of the weird and bizarre. Due to the lack of a vocal presence the theatrics of these types of bands is absent, and this allows The Fastest Steed on Earth to really find a good groove with the music it's creating. Sometimes there are even hints that the band is taking itself seriously ("Chris Fell out of Bed, Bumped His Head, and Immediately Created Evil"), but such moments must be taken in jest as the band frequently skips around just for the sake of keeping the listener guessing. Experimental work this deranged can only be a sign of great things in the future.

Key Tracks: Your Lasagna Ate My Lasagna; Space Boys; Christ Fell Out of Bed, Bumped His Head, and Immediately Created Evil


48) Don't Mess with Texas | Don't Mess With Texas
Croatia

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Label: Moonlee Records

Previously to hearing about Don't Mess with Texas, the only Croatian band I knew about was Radio Free Isaac. Little to my surprise, Don't Mess with Texas is a band comprising ex-members of Radio Free Issac. Small world/country I suppose. The band's self-titled debut album is largely a guitar driven affair, laying its foundations in guitar-rock, travelling through quiet/loud structures, and sampling from various other instruments as well. The piano is often called upon to supplement the guitar-rock sound, but a majority of the time it's done ad naseum. In tracks like "God Might Want to Change His Mind," the keys do well during the quieter moments, but no change is made when the tempo picks up and at that point the keys just sound trite and childish. While the other components of Don't Mess with Texas are solid, if the band develops its piano skills to a high degree it should result in a much more pleasureable experience.

Key Tracks: Sound of One Lung Filling WIth Water; We Excused Ourselves to the Bathroom and Had a Little Cry; God Might Want to Change His Mind;


47) Souvaris | I Felt Nothing At All
England

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Label: Bulbphone Records

Souvaris is one British band that doesn't get nearly the attention it deserves. Over the four tracks on I Felt Nothing At All, the band does quite the contrary and spills out the contents of it heart onto the canvas for full examination by the public. The band's sophisticated style of instrumental music would prove to presuppose emerging trends in the UK and US over the next two years, which would best Souvaris mainly by condensing the band's formula down to optimize harmonies and pull the listener in to an entirely new form of instrumental rock. As I look back over Souvaris' discography, I can only claim that this is one band that is always a little bit ahead of the trend, yet still predominantly ignored by critics and fans alike. However, I am certain that this band has yet to create its best work of art, so by that time hopefully people have come around to appreciate this novel act.

Key Tracks:Be He That Lives to Telephonic Only; Art As Survvial, Survival As Art (15 Minutes of Mantra-Filled Oompah); Nothing How to Live, Only to Get and Get and Get


46) Samuel Jackson Five | Same Same But Different
Norway

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Label: Honest Abe Records

Same Same But Different speaks volumes about Samuel Jackson Five's sound, which molds a lot of different influences into a moderately coherent album. It's surprising that one year later this band created the ineffable Easily Misunderstood, because Same Same But Different is much less mathy, much less jazzy, and much less energetic than its descendant. In retrospect it may be difficult to really get a good grasp on Same Same But Different as the listener constantly is waiting for the band to unleash a pure stream of energy and channel the rock and jazz gods to duel it out. This form of Samuel Jackson Five is much more restrained and focused, and definitely not the fun-loving self-indulgent bunch we now know and love them as. Nonetheless, it’s a pretty smooth and painless album that serves as a good appetizer to what this band had planned next.

Key Tracks:Counting Sheep; Clubbers Dream; Britney Spears 4 President


45) This is a Process of Still Life | This is a Process of Still Life
United States

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Label: Firefly Sessions

It's not everyday that I find a band with a Montana label on it, but This is a Process of Still Life sure fit the bill. Light, the band's first release, sets off on a journey with slick guitar melodies, subtle progressions, and nostalgic tones from beginning to end. This easy listening formula is bound to appeal to fans of Tortoise and The Six Parts Seven, but This is a Process of Still Life isn't afraid to let the reverb get out of control a little, as evidenced by "Things, Cells, Beings" and “No Memory of the Airshow.” The smooth compositions and transitions found in "Pretty is Predictable" and "Skywriting Over Virginia" is where the band truly shines, providing quite enough material to keep the mind from wandering. The only flaw in This is a Process of Still Life is the band's location; surely it would find itself a bigger fan base in another location.

Key Tracks: No Memory of the Airshow; Pretty is Predictable; Things, Cells, Beings


44) September Malevolence | Surviving Destinies
Sweden

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Label: Self-Released

I've always held the impression that great bands always have this spark about them that sets them apart from everyone else. For September Malevolence, that spark certainly must be top-notch song-writing. A year before the band really made a splash with Tomorrow We'll Wonder..., September Malevolence set a great example with Surviving Destinies, a testament to this Swedish quartet's mature mind set and unlimited appreciation of the post-rock genre. It's fairly common to see a young band emerging with a release that sounds pretty familiar to another artist, but September Malevolence is carving out its own niche from the very beginning. Very heavy, dark, moody tones and atmospheres litter Surviving Destinies and the resulting dreary landscape does a wonderful job of hiding the flaws in the release that crop up from time to time. 2004 was undoubtedly the year that Sweden left it's mark on the instrumental genre; years later it would still be demonstrating itself as one of the most creative outlets in the world.

Key Tracks: On Our Own; Surviving; Destinies Ol' Destinies


43) As the Poets Affirm | The Jaws That Bite, The Claws That Catch
Canada

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Label: Self-Released

Plugging away with cello and acoustic guitar, As the Poets Affirm lays the foundation in I Wnat to Tell You My Heart, But I Cannot Say English for a formula that would see full maturity later that year in The Jaws that Bite the Claws that Catch. Although The Jaws that Bite... is rough around the edges, it does pack quite a punch in songs like "Orange Car Crash" and "Rocket Through". The chamber rock formula is one that is still wide open to interpretation, and As the Poets Affirm steps in and turns down the experimental and classical influences for a much more straight-forward rock approach. Overall the band incorporates these two styles together well, but at points things do get messy and muddied--especially around the guitar effects, which have not been intertwined crisply into the fold. The positives inevitably outweigh the negatives in The Jaws that Bite..., and it gives us something to look forward to as the band tweaks and hones in on a more polished sound.

Key Tracks: Snow-White Wings in Bottomless Blue, Orange Car Crash, Where Flowers Should Be


42) The Dead Texan | The Dead Texan
United States

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Label: Kranky Records

In any other year where Hammock didn't prove itself to be the master of ambient/atmospheric compositions, The Dead Texan would have looked a lot better. Adam Wiltzie finds himself in some very different projects after concluding his work with Stars of the Lid. The Dead Texan washes away all thoughts with sweeping, broad ambient strokes and minimalist compositions where every key and guitar string wedges itself into the memory for proper consumption. This system doesn't really change much throughout the forty-five minute album, and as a result the listener feels sapped and fatigued by the last few bars. Several tracks deserve thundering applause for their sheer beauty -- "A Chronicle of Early Failures" and "La Ballad D'Alain Georgee," and others are on the cusp of some cathartic moments -- "Glen's Goo" and "When I See Scissors, I Can't Help But Think of You," but the two were not pulled together enough to warrant a standing ovation, which is what the album really feels like it should be aiming for.

Key Tracks: A Chronicle of Early Failures; Aegina Airlines; La Ballad D'Alain Georgee


41) People for Audio | And This Will Be Our Homecoming
Canada

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Label: Storyboard Label

And This Will Be Our Homecoming is slow to get out of the gates, but once the debut album from this Canadian post-rock outfit gets going it lays out some magnificent tracks. The title track comes in four movements, covers a wide array of instrumentation and styles, and single handedly tackles most of the spectrum of human emotion, ranging from the darkest crippling sorrow to the most joyful elation. People For Audio do well for themselves by balancing rock and jazz moods, but its decision not to let the rock aspect of the music dominate the album is largely why And This Will Be Our Homecoming sounds so refreshing to experienced ears. Capable of segueing between staggering points with only a bass and a few piano keys at its disposal, the band swiftly navigates through the album with expert skill and an honest mind set. If And This Will Be Our Homecoming is any indication, People For Audio is one Canadian band to watch out for in the future.

Key Tracks: Red Skied Morning; Coversation in a Minor Tone; And This Will Be Our Homecoming


40) Sparrows Swarm and Sing! | Untitled I EP
United States

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Label: Self-Released

Sparrows Swarm and Sing! can easily convince you that it's from Montreal and is part of the Constellation Records family. If imitation is the greatest form of flattery, Sparrows Swarm and Sing! are doing its best to flatter the pants off of Godspeed You! Black Emperor. Untitled I has most of it down to a formula, it's just missing some wacked out vocals and/or audio samples and you could probably interchange the two bands pretty readily. There is a slight trace of some folk influence from this New England sextet, but it's often buried in the rough production of the EP. Even then, Sparrows Swarm and Sing! needs to find a way to carve out its own niche or it'll never be able to escape the GY!BE tag. If it continues along this route, soon we may be calling them Sparrows Swarm! and Sing.

Key Tracks: One


39) Battles | EP C/B EP
United States

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Label: Monitor Records, Dim Mak Records, and Cold Sweat Records

Comprising ex-members of Don Caballero and Tomahawk, Battles has quite the expectations to fill. EP C and B EP were meant to provide a sample of the bands jamming and hopefully shed some light onto the future of this project. That goal was a complete failure, as the tracks themselves couldn't be more unrelated to one another, but this foul eventually turns into a treasure all its own. The unpredictability of these releases are exactly what turns the music on to the listener, presenting a wild ride through musical thought and form. Battles throws all of its past projects to the wind and embraces the uncertain and glorious future. What’s in store next?

Key Tracks: Sz2; B + T; Hi/Lo


38) Mortimur | Mortimur
United States

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Label: We Want Action

The now disbanded Mortimur put on an impressive display on its first and only album. Mortimur follows in the footsteps of legendary acts Don Caballero, Dysrhythmia, and Fucking Champs with a melee of math rock decorated up with jazz and metal influences. This allows the band to compose some high energy, devastating tracks ("Vally of the Foothills," "White Rat"), as well as some chill, low-key tracks ("Isla"), and some that combine the two ("Deselectra," "God's Breath"). The latter of these ideas almost sound like the beginning phases of Pelican's The Fire in Our Throat Will Beckon the Thaw, and one could conjecture that this is where Mortimur was inevitably headed, though it seems unlikely that a band with the aforementioned influences would settle with such elementary goals in mind.

Key Tracks: Valley of the Foothills; Isla; White Rat


37) Once We Were | Winter Kept Us Warm EP
Sweden

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Label: Tenderversion Recordings

The first release from Once We Were off of TenderVersion Recordings is mostly a lackluster affair. Once We Were shines when it keeps its songs short and to the point. "In Silent Traffic" and "Em," radiate some very good vibes and invoke a thought that this is the type of instrumental music that could one day be fit for radio play. Winter Kept Us Warm takes the middle path for most of the EP, never straying too far to the quiet side and drowning itself in minimalism and never getting too loud or complicated for an "easy listen." Yet, Once Were Were does compose some very pretty songs, despite its divergent and sometimes jazzy tendencies. Hopefully the band's full length will properly develop these ideas into a more mature and sophisticated listening experience.

Key Tracks: In Silent Traffic; The Heart Asks Pleasure First; Em


36) Grace Cathedral Park | In the Evenings of Regret
United States

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Label: La Verdad Records

One of the more upsetting things in the post-rock genre is an album that has potential to excel in a lot of areas but comes short in all of them. Evenings of Regret, the seventy-six minute debut of Grace Cathedral Park has a lot of good elements of the post-rock form down, but never fully executes any of them. Grace Cathedral Park is sometimes cinematic, sometimes quiet and pretty, and sometimes builds towards a great cathartic finale. However, to be truely cinematic the band must devote the majority of the album to doing so (see The Six Parts Seven), which Grace Cathedral Park doesn't. It also never realizes that great cathartic finale, so it makes the listener feel a bit unsatisfied. This could leave the band just performing a very slow, quiet, pretty ballad, but the instrumentation is too rustic for that as well. I greatly enjoy the idea behind In the Evenings of Regret, but this just wasn't the release where the band was able to pull everything together in a coherent piece of art.

Key Tracks: Play Delicate, Desire Quiet; It is the Hurt You're Drowning In; Hey Pretty, Could You Stay Awhile


35) By the End of Tonight | Fireworks on Ice EP
United States

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Label: Temporary Residence Limited

Not one to drink from the well of the other Texan instrumental bands, By the End of Tonight shows its demented side in Fireworks on Ice, which contains a collection of four songs which sound like a hyper version of The Advantage not covering video game songs and smoking a bit too much crack for its own good. Cutting deep with an experimental edge, By the End of Tonight fills the gap with a putrid concoction of psychedelia inspired, hardcore-slinging, video-gamming energy. By the end of the EP the band does return to form a little with "It's Christmas Time Again," which slowly unwinds itself from the rigid confines of the sadistic madhouse and starts to accept a more hedonistic lifestyle. Fireworks on Ice is an impressive display from this creative band who has a knack for letting loose.

Key Tracks: Sleeping While Driving Prevents Old Age; Video Games Buried in the Desert; It's Christmas Time Again


34) The Exploits of Elaine | Untitled EP
England

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Label: Self-Released

The third of three like minded EPs, Untitled continues the line of thinking explored in Happy the Sky and Heavy Electricity. In a twisted realm, The Exploits of Elanie is making some really standard music. On Earth the band makes bizarre, surreal-industrial-space-dream instrumental rock. It's the kind of music aliens would be playing when they abduct all the humans beings on Earth and forcibly bring them aboard a spacecraft to start sucking their brains out. I think even Tim Burton can get a good feeling from that. But it's all fun and games in the end, right? Tracking in around twenty minutes in length, it's miraculous that the band is capable of packing so much material in such a short amount of time. Untitled leaves the listener feeling full and bloated, but then again, maybe that's just the post-labotomy daze doing the trick. In any case, The Exploits of Elaine leaves us wanting more, as always, but keep the world waiting for a full length record to consume.

Key Tracks: Alaska; Drop; Funeral Song


33) Microfilm | Journey to the 75th
France

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Label: Rejuvenation Records

My French is not so good, but I'd put a wager down that the French movie samples used in Journey to the 75th carry with them a political underpinning, much akin to From Monument to Masses. Or maybe they're aiming more with a religious backing. Either way, the two are nearly inseparable nowadays in the United States, so it may as well all be the same. Microfilm does excel at crafting straightforward instrumental rock songs with a forceful guitar presence. These short songs pack quite a punch ("Fancy Nancy," "Intrepide"), making good use of delay and reverb to wear away the rough compositional edges to the point of numbness. For such a one-track approach to song-writing, Microfilm does get pretty contemplative at times, as seen in "Secret Camera" and "Margaret on the Rocks." Journey to the 75th is an important release for the French instrumental scene, which is doing its best to keep up with current trends.

Key Tracks: Secret Camera; Fancy Nancy; Intrepide


32) Detwiije | Six is Better than Eight
England

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Label: Vacuous Pop

For the large amount of bands using a violin in their song-writing, very few of them appear to have a valid reason why it is there other than relying on the copout that guitar, bass, and drums just doesn't leave a full, rich sound. These bands would do well to take a cue or two from Detwiije who have taken the thought behind Godspeed You! Black Emperor and boiled it down into a shorter eight minute epic story. "La Guerre De Mondes" rolls off of the EP and into the listener's heart, inviting a very warm emotional response. "Waltz" is a much more playful song as it takes itself much less seriously than "La Guerre De Mondes" and mimics a more optimistic attitude. These two tracks together paint a very delightful picture of Detwiije, who certainly has some very good things in store for the future.

Key Tracks: Bee; La Guerre De Mondes; Waltz


31) Clogs | Stick Music
Australia

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Label: Brassland Records

Stick Music, the third album from Clogs, is the most eclectic collection of songs from the band yet. Clogs harnesses many "exotic" sounding compositions on its way to creating a hybrid of neo-classical and world music. I'll be the first to say I despise the label of "world music," but Clogs really stretches themselves creatively in Stick Music and the result speaks for itself. En route to developing a very holistic, universal sound, much of the personal and emotional connection between the band's work and the music is lost in translation. This isn't a huge setback for the band, but some of the returning fans may feel as if the album is missing an intangible part; most likely it is this key component. Clogs isn't for everyone, as it takes a strong interest in string arrangements and orchestral sounds to really dive into this band, but those who do should appreciate the fine craftsmanship on Stick Music.

Key Tracks: Pencil Stick; River Stick; Witch Stick


30) The Silence Kit | Pieonear
Russia

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Label: Figurestatic Music

It's so damn cold in Russia all the time that The Silence Kit's follow up to its self titled debut contains only three songs. Luckily the elapsed time of these three songs is over an hour. I really feel like The Silence Kit should be one of the best instrumental bands in the world. I really do. These guys excrete talent like The Evpatoria Report, but like their Swiss contemporaries they focus more on presentation than on form and as a result the song-writing is not always up to par. All things considered, the thirty-eight minute behemoth know as "Psycho Parasite" still delivers its fair share of bone-crushing punches. Probably the most important part of the band's sound is it's disjoint from the rest of the instrumental genre and does its best to make homemade compositions work. This is a band who does all it can to get the most milage of out its creative input. Pieonear really sounds absolutely nothing like any of its peers and may just come straight from the twisted minds of these young Russian musicians. At some points it's embracing and warm, and at others it wholly nightmarish. Sometimes it's both at once. Pieoner is a great stepping stone from this innovative band, who again show that it has something to offer to the world.

Key Tracks; Psycho Parastie; Lemon Street Smell


29) Migala | La Increíble Aventura
Spain

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Label: Acuarela Discos

For a band with five albums under its belt, Migala has remained a very low-key player on the instrumental scene, especially considering that this band has been at it as long (or longer) than Mogwai and Explosions in the Sky and some of its guitar work is just incredible. La Increíble Aventura finds the band continuing the path from experimental rock into post-rock that it started travelling down in Restos de un Incendio. Tracks are certainly more incendiary, which is apparent from the very start of the album with its crashing drums and volatile guitars. "El Gran Miercoles" caps off the album in a beautiful display of the band's ability to write heart-wrenching songs that unfolds like a blooming flower. With a history as long and rich as Migala, it’s great to see that the band continually pushes themselves in new directions and isn’t afraid of embracing risk.

Key Tracks: El Imperio Del Mar; Dear Fear; El Gran Miercoles


28) Moly | Moly
England

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Label: Tenor Vossa Records

Before it was cool to be an experimental rock band in England, Moly was shattering audiences everywhere with an impenetrable wall of sound. That's really all you need to know about this band. Moly repeatedly builds up a bigger and bigger walls of sound via layers of guitar effects and feedback. Often this force looms so dauntingly over the landscape that the drums cower in fear of being annihilated by the overpowering guitars. While Moly has its fair share of Mogwai influence, more frequently the band branches into a very thick and dark form of space rock. Unrelenting, aggressive, deafening, almost psychotic -- Moly is an experiment in masochism. It is quite an amazing feat that the band is capable of staying so distant from any sort of metal influence while cultivating such a raw and intense sound. Those longing for a punishment need to check out Moly now.

Key Tracks: Red Equals Meltdown; Winning Through Intimidation; This is Day One


27) Jakob | Dominion EP
New Zealand

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Label: Midium Records

After the raging success of Cale:Drew, Jakob returns with a thirty minute single. Dominion takes a deep journey into the band's spatial boundaries, extracting many of its finer qualities for display as it tries out different combinations of approaches that made the aforementioned album such a pleasurable listen. Epic pronunciations are strewn wildly into the composition while Jakob satisfies the crowd with a authoritative dose of guitar-rock. From the towering heights of the mountaintop Jakob is able to look down upon the world and the ascent back to Earth is really where this band excels at setting itself apart from the crowd. Spatial boundaries are pushed to the limits during the hectic finale, but “Dominion” leaves no rock unturned in its glorious denouement.

Key Tracks: Dominion


26) The Six Parts Seven | [Everywhere] [and Right Here]
United States

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Label: Suicide Squeeze Records

On the band's 4th album, The Six Parts Seven is again fine tuning its sound to explore new areas of its music. This time we see the quartet humbly tipping its hat to The Mercury Program by presenting a response to the band's A Data Learn the Language (and all of its Tortoise influence). However, The Six Parts Seven enjoys bringing everything down a notch, and Everything and Right Here takes a much more scenic route and strips the music of the layers and layers of delay and vibraphone intensity. Slow, clean compositions gradually transport the listener along the album and the ride is a cinematic one. Rich guitar lines and serene landscapes are the guide through this listening experience. The Six Parts Seven never look back as it transforms notes into a vivid painting where each brush stroke bleeds with sincerity and evokes countless emotions.

Key Tracks: What You Love You Must Love Now; We Can Just Make Out; A Blueprint of Something Never Finished


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